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ARAB 200-010/080: Advanced Intermediate Arabic (Credits: 3)

Ikram Masmoudi

A continuation of ARAB 107. Emphasis is on reading comprehension, improving writing and listening skills, and increasing knowledge of Arab culture.

Prerequisite(s): ARAB 107

ARAB 200: Advanced Intermediate Arabic (Credits: 3)

Ikram Masmoudi

A continuation of ARAB107. Emphasis is on reading comprehension, improving writing and listening skills, and increasing knowledge of Arab culture.

Prerequisite(s): ARAB 107

ARAB 201: Arabic Grammar and Composition (Credits: 3)

Ikram Masmoudi

Arab 201 is focused on a grammar and composition review. A thorough review of the main grammatical patterns of the language.

 

Prerequisite(s): ARAB 107

ARAB 205-010/080: Arabic Conversation (Credits: 3)

Ikram Masmoudi

Arab 205 is a continuation of Arab 200. Emphasis on developing and improving conversational skills through reading comprehension and discussion of themes such as study abroad, migration, traditions of the Arab world etc.

Prerequisite(s): ARAB 200

CHIN 200-010/80: Chinese Grammar and Composition (Credits: 3)

Haihong Yang

This course aims at a further development of all four language skills which the students have acquired from the 100-level CHIN courses. In particular, the course emphasizes a further study of advanced Chinese grammar and basic essay writing. In this course students will not only learn authentic Chinese in terms of idiomatic usages, familiar sayings, and sophisticated grammar structure, but get to know Chinese society and culture as well. By the end of this course, students should have commanded around 250 new words and/or phrases in order to engage in linguistically and culturally sophisticated communication in Chinese.

CHIN 201: Advanced Intermediate Chinese I (Credits: 3)

Renee Dong

This is a four-skilled course providing training in all areas of language use with a strong emphasis on reading and listening comprehension. Students will be exposed to authentic and communicative materials from formal textbooks, supplementary listening exercises and pop music.

Prerequisite(s): CHIN107 or with the instructor's approval

CHIN 204-010/80: Chinese Calligraphy (Credits: 3)

Maria Tu

This course introduces students to the rich art of Chinese calligraphy. Students will first learn how to use brush pen to practice Chinese calligraphy after learning Tai Chi and meditation. Students will learn basics of Chinese painting and be able to pain simple objects such as insects, fish, and flowers.

CHIN 350-010/80: Business Chinese (Credits: 3)

Renee Dong

This advanced intermediate Chinese language course prepares students for effective communication in casual and formal business settings. While systemically providing trainings in all four aspects of language study (listening, speaking, reading and writing), this course has a strong emphasis on fluency in listening and speaking and focuses on the practical and functional use of the language. The students will practice language use and functions in common business situations, conduct company case analysis and review business news reports. As culture and context are critical for successful foreign language learning, this course also incorporates information about Chinese business culture and etiquette to promote socially appropriate language use.

CHIN 355: Advanced Readings in Chinese (Credits: 3)

Haihong Yang

This course is designed to improve students’ integrated language skills through dialogues from TV programs and films. Students will develop abilities to comprehend authentic language materials, understand features of spoken and written Chinese, and produce paragraph-level Chinese on familiar topics.

CHIN 451-010/080: Readings in Chinese Literature (Credits: 3)

Haihong Yang

The course introduces students to representative works in Chinese culture and literature. It focuses on cultural tradition(s), literary conventions and innovations, genres, and major cultural movements. The course has a two-fold purpose: help students obtain an advanced ability to read Chinese cultural and literary texts in their richness and complexity, and acquaint them with a basic knowledge of Chinese literary writing. The course will be conducted in Mandarin Chinese. The course has a dual track.

CHIN 452: Readings in Chinese Culture (Credits: 3)

Haihong Yang

This course aims to improve students’ reading and writing proficiency through rigorously reading and responding to essays on Chinese culture. Students will have a chance to develop their abstract reasoning skills in addition to being able to narrate and describe.

CHIN 455: Classical Chinese (Credits: 3)

Haihong Yang

This class introduces basic grammatical structures, syntactic patterns, and historical development of classical Chinese. It offers basic training in classical Chinese through translation and discussion in class, focusing on grammar and vocabulary. The course is taught in English and Chinese.

FREN 200-010/080: French Grammar and Composition (Credits: 3)

Ali Alalou

This course provides a comprehensive grammar review contextualized in contemporary readings including French and Francophone literary selections.  The completion of grammar exercises from the textbook and workbook foster correct usage of the French language.  Students respond to questions on the texts studied and write micro-themes in response to prompts to develop a polished writing style.

Prerequisite(s): FREN107 This course may be taken for Honors credit. It is highly recommended that those pursuing Honors credit for this course have earned final grades of A or A- in previous French coursework.

FREN 209-010/080: French Conversation Through Films (Credits: 3)

Edgard Sankara

A conversation course contextualized in mainstream films, animated shorts, and popular short documentaries, this class invites you to build and to practice your oral and aural skills in French while watching a variety of cinematic products from the French-speaking world. Some films are as close as your nearest laptop.

Prerequisite(s): FREN107 or one 200-level French course. Minimum grade of B- required for prerequisites.

FREN 211-010/080: French Reading and Composition (Credits: 3)

Judy Celli

In French 211, you will read fascinating short stories while increasing your ability to comprehend literature beyond the level of plot. You will learn to write short papers dealing with the literary complexities of each work. Increase your vocabulary and grammatical accuracy while studying works of exoticism, naturalism and the fantastic.

Prerequisite(s): FREN 107 with a minimum grade of A- or FREN 200 with a minimum grade of C.

FREN 211-010/080: FREN 211-010: Reading and Composition (Credits: 3)

Karen Quandt

This course includes reading and discussion of French literature and the writing of short papers alongside of grammar review. The emphasis of the course is on improving critical reading skills and on writing formal analysis of literature. Students will be introduced to literary movements and cultural topics. Honor credit involves supplementary readings, an additional paper, and meetings outside of class with the professor.

Prerequisite(s): FREN 200 (minimum grade of C) or FREN107 (minimum grade of A-)Satisfies ‘Group A’ Arts and Science breadth requirement.This course may be taken for Honors credit. It is highly recommended that those pursuing Honors credit for this course have earned final grades of A or A- in previous French coursework.

FREN 211-011/081: Reading and Composition (Credits: 3)

Edgard Sankara

This course includes reading and discussion of French literature, frequent compositions and grammar review where appropriate. The emphasis of this course is on improving reading fluency, critical reading skills, and composition. FREN 211 presents thorough readings of short stories with discussion of these readings beyond the level of plot and in conjunction with literary movements and film adaptations. Students will write compositions based on readings and other topics. Grammar will be reviewed.

Prerequisite(s): FREN 200 with a minimum grade of C or FREN 107 with a minimum grade of A-.FREN 211 is required as a prerequisite for FREN 301 or 302May be taken for honors credit. It is highly recommended that those pursuing Honors credit for this course have earned final grades of A or A- in previous French coursework.

FREN 211-011/081: French Reading and Composition (Credits: 3)

Edgard Sankara

This course includes reading and discussion of French and Francophone literature and the writing of compositions. The emphasis of this course is on improving critical reading skills and on writing formal academic essays. Therefore, a close reading of the text (in regard to character development, historical or social context, and narrative voice for example) encourages the student to move beyond the level of plot summary to analyze the works under study. Students will be introduced to literary movements such as Naturalism and Existentialism. Grammar review is incorporated to accompany the readings.

Prerequisite(s): FREN 107 with a minimum grade of A- or FREN 200 with a minimum grade of C.

FREN 301-010/080: Introduction to French Literature – Prose (Credits: 3)

Edgard Sankara

This course, taught in French, will introduce you to a selection of French texts in which a woman character plays a central role. Through a gendered reading of the texts, we will explore such themes as chastity, obedience, the self and the Other, the “angel in the house,” the vexing problems of love, lovers, marriage, family, self-determination, and self-expression. In female-voiced texts, the confirmation or rejection of traditional gender roles is articulated by a series of submissive or resourceful women who seek to understand both themselves and the world they live in. Small group work, roundtable discussion, and literary analysis frame our study of women and passion. Authors include Chateaubriand, Proust, Yourcenar, Rawiri, Sarraute, Robbe-Grillet, and Hémon.

Prerequisite(s): FREN 211 and any 200-level course taught in the French language, both with a suggested minimum grade of B-. This course may be taken for Honors credit; it is highly recommended that those pursuing Honors credit in this course have earned final grades of A or A- in previous French coursework.Satisfies the College of Arts and Sciences Group B breadth requirement.

FREN 302-010/080: Introduction to French Literature: Poetry and Theatre (Credits: 3)

Deborah Steinberger

Unlock the mysteries of poetry, and learn to read between the lines of a play! This course explores verse and drama from the Renaissance through the twentieth century through close readings and class discussion. We will study works by some of France’s best-loved poets—Ronsard, La Fontaine, Hugo, Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Valéry—and classic theater by Molière, Racine, and Anouilh. In the company of such illustrious writers, you are sure to see your own style and vocabulary improve!

Prerequisite(s): FREN 211 and any 200-level course taught in the French language, both with a suggested minimum grade of B-. This course may be taken for Honors credit; it is highly recommended that those pursuing Honors credit in this course have earned final grades of A or A- in previous French coursework.Satisfies the College of Arts and Sciences Group B breadth requirement.

FREN 305: French Conversation and Composition (Credits: 3)

Deborah Steinberger

French 305 is an advanced conversation and composition course, conducted entirely in French, which focuses primarily on current issues in France and the francophone world. Topics covered include politics (with a special focus on the upcoming French presidential election), social issues, science and technology, and the arts. You will practice French through oral reports and discussions, as well as through regular written assignments including movie reviews and your own blog. Grammar review will be tailored to the needs of the class.

Prerequisite(s): FREN 211 and one other 200-level course taught in French, both with a suggested minimum grade of B-.This course may be taken for Honors credit; it is highly recommended that those pursuing Honors credit in this course have earned final grades of A or A- in previous French coursework.Not intended for native speakers of French.

FREN 325: French Civilization I (Credits: 3)

Deborah Steinberger

An interdisciplinary exploration of French civilization–history, politics, art, architecture, music, literature–from its origins to the Revolution.

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level courses taught in French.This course may be taken for Honors credit; it is highly recommended that those pursuing Honors credit in this course have earned final grades of A or A- in previous French coursework.Satisfies 'Group B' Arts and Science breadth requirement.

FREN 350-010/080: Business French (Credits: 3)

Ali Alalou

Are you looking for a course that will complement your major or minor in International Business, Marketing, the Hospitality Industry, International Relations, Political Science, Economics, French, or French Studies? Are you hoping to function effectively in the global marketplace? For students who want to put their foreign language skills to use, this practical course builds commercial vocabulary and an understanding of authentic business literature, develops the ability to speak French in a business context, and  familiarizes students with French business practices and business writing. Individual and team projects geared to the student’s own major or minor simulate real workplace experiences. Some focus on the mechanics of translation and the formatting of the CV and business correspondence.

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level courses taught in French. Fulfills a 3xx course requirement for the French major.

FREN 355: Love, Passion, Faith and Death (Credits: 3)

Bruno Thibault

Does love exist without passion? Is there such a thing as platonic love? Are there different kinds of love? What does it mean to enter an union “until death does us part”? This course focuses on those themes in French literature across the centuries and across the genres. It will provide insights on love and passion from some of the greatest French poets and novelists, among them Ronsard, Corneille, Hugo, Baudelaire, as well as Chateaubriand and Flaubert. Taught in French.

Prerequisite(s): FREN 211, and any 200-level course taught in the French language, both with a suggested minimun grade of B-.This course may be taken for Honors credit; it is highly recommended that those pursuing Honors credit in this course have earned final grades of A or A- in previous French coursework.

FREN 405: Translation and Stylistics (Credits: 3)

Deborah Steinberger

Here’s the advanced-level language course you’ve been looking for! Expand your vocabulary and improve your writing style as you study the fascinating craft of translation. Working in groups to translate various texts (literary, journalistic, commercial) from French to English and vice versa, students enrolled in this course will acquire a marketable skill as well as enhanced knowledge of French and Francophone culture. Activities may include composing film subtitles and simultaneous interpretation. A service-learning component will involve translating the website of a French humanitarian organization.

Prerequisite(s): Two 300-level French courses with a minimum grade of B+.This course may be taken for Honors credit; it is highly recommended that those pursuing Honors credit in this course have earned final grades of A or A- in previous French coursework.

FREN 412/612-010: Great Authors II: 1750-Present (Credits: 3)

Bruno Thibault

Selected readings of master authors from the dawn of Romanticism to the present. Authors mayinclude Rousseau, Hugo, Flaubert, Baudelaire, Proust, Gide, Valéry, Colette, Camus, Sartre,Yourcenar, Beauvoir, Tournier, Robbe-Grillet, Duras, and others.

Prerequisite(s): FREN 3XX and FREN 3XX literature with a suggested minimum grade of B-

FREN 423/623-010: Medieval Literature (Credits: 3)

Bruno Thibault

Are you interested in the stories of knights and princesses, troubadours and villains, sorcerers and serfs, kings and jesters? Do the names of Lancelot and Guinevere, Tristan and Iseult, Heloise and Abelard appeal to your imagination? Have you ever daydreamed about Merlin’s magical tricks and the quest of the Grail? Sometimes referred to wrongly as the ‘Dark Ages’, the Middles Ages represent over a thousand immensely rich years of cultural history. This course will focus on the literary masterpieces from that period and discuss how medieval people thought about love and war, what they strove for, dreamed about, laughed at and feared.

Prerequisite(s): FREN 3XX and FREN 3XX literature with a suggested minimum grade of B-

FREN 455/655: The literature of modern life: Representations of the 19th-Century France (Credits: 3)

Karen Quandt

This course will examine major 19th century corks and their representations of modern life through multiple facets: cultural phenomena (the press, travel, art and music), society (the rise of the bourgeois, urbanization, industry), history (Revolution, Napoleon, the Second Empire), and major philosophical discourses (the human relationship to nature, romantic aesthetic theories, Marxism). Major readings will include Chateaubriand’s René, Stendhal’s Le Rouge et le Noir, Hugo’s Hernani, selections from Baudelaire’s Les fleurs du mal, Flaubert’s L’Education sentimentale, and Zola’s Germinal.

Prerequisite(s): Any two 300-level French literature courses.

FREN 459/659: Négritude, Antillanité, Créolité (Credits: 3)

Edgard Sankara

What is the Caribbean? Does history begin with Christopher Columbus? Should one consider the Native American component as a significant element in the construction of this region or should the Caribbean simply be called a New World which developed with slavery and the plantation system?

Are the Caribbean people Native American, Indian, European, African, Asian or are they a fascinating métissage (mix) of all these ethnicities? What are the historical, cultural and political situations of Francophone Caribbean people (Haiti and the “French Overseas Departments”) within the global Caribbean region? Why are the literary movements of Négritude, Antillanité, Créolitésuch an important contribution to a better understanstanding of the Caribbean and to the enrichment of the now flourishing subject of Postcolonial Studies?

Come and whet your intellectual curiosity about the Caribbean through the study of prose, fiction, plays, poems, critical essays and films on Aimé Césaire, Raphael Confiant, Maryse Condé, Léopold Senghor, and more. This course satisfies Multicultural requirement.

Prerequisite(s): Any two 300-level French literature courses.

FREN 875-010: Writing about Love: Seminar in Seventeenth-Century French Literature (Credits: 3)

Deborah Steinberger

Is love an ennobling passion? a dangerous snare? an unattainable ideal? a game of mirrors? In this course we will study the prevailing ideas about love in seventeenth-century France, considering male and female points of view, and a variety of literary genres: fable, fairy tale, maxim, letter, portrait, story and novel. To the extent possible, the course will be conducted as a literary salon: students will engage in debate, try their hand at composition, and critique each other’s productions. Works we will study include Molière, Les Précieuses ridicules and L’Ecole des femmes ; Racine, Andromaque; Guilleragues, Lettres portugaises; La Rochefoucauld, Maximes; La Fayette, La Princesse de Clèves and La Comtesse de Tende; Choisy, L’Héritier and Perrault, La Marquise-Marquis de Banneville; plus fairy tales by Perrault, D’Aulnoy, and L’Héritier, selected fables by La Fontaine, and film versions or treatments of at least three of the works on the syllabus.

Prerequisite(s): Enrollment is restricted to graduate students. Course taught entirely in French.

FREN 875: Aspects of Contemporary French Literature (Credits: 3)

Bruno Thibault

It is often said that contemporary French writers are less interested in politics than their elders and more interested in subtle plots and intricate story-telling. But we will see that these sophisticated writers also attempt to reflect the profound cultural mutation of contemporary France by addressing issues such as consumerism, ecology, feminism, European integration, globalization and immigration. Readings will include novels by Georges Perec, Marguerite Duras and Michel Tournier; short stories by J.M.G Le Clézio and poems by Yves Bonnefoy.

Prerequisite(s): For French graduate students only.

GREK 201-010/080: Ancient Prose: Intermediate Greek (Credits: 3)

Marcaline Boyd

This first-reading course in ancient Greek is devoted to the “father of history” Herodotus of Halicarnassus. Class time will include translating passages from Herodotus’ Persian Wars to build fluency in reading Greek, exploring issues of Herodotean scholarship (e.g. narrative technique, ethnographic writing, veracity in reporting), and to gaining perspective of the Greek speaking world of the 5th century BCE and the conflict between East and West. As a first-reading course, there will also be an extensive review of grammar and syntax.

GRMN 200: German Grammar Review (Credits: 3)

Nancy Nobile

Have you taken every 100-level German class but are still not sure where to place the verb?  Are you still taking wild guesses on adjective endings?  Do you rely a little too heavily on your imagination in order to form past participles?  Then GRMN 200 is just right for you!  This course is designed to provide you with an opportunity to improve your basic language skills, thus building greater confidence and proficiency.  Our review of grammar will include activities that also develop your writing, reading, and speaking skills.  There will be quizzes, some short essays, a midterm and a final exam.

Prerequisite(s): German 107 or the equivalent. Not intended for students who have already completed German courses at the 300-level or above.

GRMN 205-010/080: German Conversation (Credits: 3)

Ester Riehl

When you are trying to improve your German conversation skills, you need to learn some new vocabulary, strengthen your grasp of grammar concepts, and listen to more spoken German. We will do all these things while covering topics on day-to-day life, contemporary film and music. Vocabulary and conversation stand at the center of this course, but we will also practice grammar and do some writing projects. Grades will be based on class participation, homework, quizzes, and oral midterm and final exams.

Note: Not intended for students who have already completed German courses at the 300-level or above

Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of GRMN 107 or equivalent

GRMN 211-010/080: German Reading and Writing (Credits: 3)

Nancy Nobile

Designed as an introduction to literature for students who have developed basic German language skills, this course will enable you to read German fiction with greater ease and appreciation.  In order to build confidence gradually, we’ll begin with very short stories, progressing step-by-step to longer ones.  We’ll also work with contemporary music and video.  On occasion, we’ll review selected aspects of grammar.  Students will write several short essays, a midterm, and a final.

Prerequisite(s): German 107 or equivalent.This course fulfills an Arts and Sciences ‘Group A’ requirement.

GRMN 255: Germany in the News (Credits: 3)

Nancy Nobile

What are the hopes and concerns of people in today’s Germany? What role does Germany play in the expanding focus of the European Union? What are the most talked about cultural issues of the day? To find answers to these and other questions, we’ll read and discuss online newspaper and magazine articles, and view excerpts from German TV news. Discussion of emergent issues in Germany — from pop culture to politics — will improve your speaking, reading, and listening skills. In increments over the course of the semester, students will create their own newspapers. They will be asked to participate frequently in class discussions, to give one group presentation, and to take a midterm and final exam.

Prerequisite(s): GRMN107 or the equivalent.

GRMN 325: German Civilization & Culture (Credits: 3)

Nancy Nobile

In the span of a century the politics and culture of Germany have changed dramatically many times over.  Some of the topics we’ll discuss in this course include urban modernization at the turn-of-century, the Weimar Republic, the rise and fall of the Third Reich, the two Germanys of the Cold War period, and Unification.  To help illustrate these topics, we’ll consider readings (including a graphic novel), paintings, architecture, music, and film.  Students will be asked to participate actively in class discussions, to write short essays/homeworks, and to take a midterm and final exam.

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level courses taught in German. This course fulfills a College of Arts and Sciences Group B requirement.

GRMN 355-010/080: German Fairy Tales (Credits: 3)

Monika Shafi

This course will explore German Fairy Tales and youth literature from the 19th century to the present. We will begin with some of the world-famous fairy tales by the Brothers Grimm and discuss the tales’ origins, patterns, and the reasons for their continual appeal across generations and times. Why, for example, do stories intended for children often contain so much violence and cruelty? Do fairy tales express universal truths or is their message culturally-specific? Next we will explore some classic German youth literature and focus on their educational message. What did these texts want to teach children and how did their didactic goals and methods evolve over time? We will conclude with some contemporary examples and compare their message to earlier examples. We will be examining a variety of media such as illustrated texts, films, TV shows, and audio books. Students are expected to write three essays and take a mid-term and final exam.

Prerequisite(s): Two 200-level courses conducted in German

GRMN 355: The 20th Century in Film (Credits: 3)

Ester Riehl

In the 20th century, film emerged as an exciting and frightening new medium. Whether intended to spread political propaganda, provide an entertaining escape from daily life, or to experiment with new ways of expressing art forms and ideas, film came to be a powerful tool that both reflected and shaped German experiences throughout the century. In this course we will examine films from the early 20th century to today to see how they have dealt with some of the major social, political and historical issues Germany has faced in the last 100 years. Students will write short assignments for each film, as well as two longer essays, a midterm and a final exam. The class is taught exclusively in German.

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level courses taught in German.

GRMN 455-010/080: Literature & Culture of the Weimar Republic (Credits: 3)

Nancy Nobile

The Weimar Republic, Germany’s first democracy, was a period of prolific creativity in literature.  Writers portrayed topics such as changing perceptions of gender, new sexual freedom, poverty and inequality, and the rise of fascism.  In this course we’ll read works by authors including Bertolt Brecht, Thomas Mann, Marieluise Fleißer, Erich Kästner, and Irmgard Keun.  We’ll start with shorter, easier texts (poetry, a musical play), then short stories, and build skill toward reading novels in the latter part of the semester.  Students will write short essays, a midterm, and a final.

Prerequisite(s): Two 300-level courses conducted in German. May be taken concurrently with a 300-level course.

GRMN 455: Tales of Love and Romance (Credits: 3)

Monika Shafi

Love and romance rank among the oldest, most familiar, and most popular themes in literature and in film. Why we fall in love or out of it, how we express emotions for which language seems inadequate, and how ideas of love, romance, and marriage change over times, such questions have baffled authors for centuries and they continue to intrigue them. In this course we will examine the depiction of romantic love, marriage, and betrayal within social, cultural, and economic contexts starting in the 18th century and ending with contemporary films and stories, some of which explore the impact of social media on relationships. Students will write three essays, give an oral presentation. and also take a midterm and a final.

Prerequisite(s): Any two 300-level courses taught in German.

HEBR205: Hebrew Conversation (Credits: 3)

Eynat Gutman

Come and strengthen your conversational skills, learn/improve future tense, and be exposed to Israeli culture, through discussions, conversations, texts, audio and visual material – and have fun.

In this course, our main focus is perfecting our speaking and listening skills, although some emphasis is put on reading and writing. The students who come to Conversational Hebrew are expected to be proficient in the present and past tenses, and able to apply all language skills to many of the following topics: the University, food, family, body parts, aches and pains, the days of the week and time. Throughout the course, the students will carry discussions, conversations, perform pair-work, and listen to auditory and visual materials. The topics of this semester will include “the revival of Hebrew,” “my future home” and “future plans.” Grammatically, we will focus mainly on acquiring the future tense in conversation and writing.

Prerequisite(s): HEBR107 or professor’s permission (students who had 3-4 years of Hebrew in high school are usually also good candidates for this course. Other students may qualify!) andthe course is cross-listed with JWST, and may be taken towards the minor in Jewish Studies. See the professor for details

ITAL 200-010/080: Italian Grammar Review (Credits: 3)

Giorgio Melloni

You want to learn a second language, but you’re afraid of being bored. Then take this opportunity to change your opinion! You will be engaged in learning Italian and its grammar through short stories, films, debates and many other activities. This course is a great way to review the fundamentals of the language and fine tune your communication skills.

Prerequisite(s): ITAL 107. Honors credit available

ITAL 205-010/080: Italian Conversation (Credits: 3)

Giorgio Melloni

You’re so close to proficiency in Italian! Consolidate your hard-earned language skills through   conversation and oral presentations, with grammar review and written work when appropriate.    Students will discuss current events along with material from films, the Internet and other sources. Have fun while improving your speaking skills!

Prerequisite(s): ITAL 107. Honors credit available

ITAL 211-010/080: Italian Reading & Composition: Short Fiction (Credits: 3)

Riccarda Sagesse

Let the masters of the Italian short story teach you to write! This course emphasizes vocabulary acquisition and written expression. Students will read and discuss short works of literature and film. You will improve your writing skills, add to your rich stock of conversation topics in Italian, and begin your love affair with contemporary Italian authors.

Prerequisite(s): ITAL 200, 205, or 206. Honors credit available.

ITAL 200: Italian Grammar Review (Credits: 3)

Giorgio Melloni

You want to learn a second language, but you’re afraid of being bored. Then take this opportunity to change your opinion! You will be engaged in learning Italian and its grammar through short stories, films, music, debates and many other activities. This course is a great way to review the fundamentals of the language and fine tune your communication skills.

Prerequisite(s): ITAL107

ITAL 205: Italian Conversation (Credits: 3)

Laura Salsini

You’re so close to proficiency in Italian! Consolidate your hard-earned language skills through conversation and oral presentations, with grammar review and written work when appropriate. Students will discuss current events along with material from films, the Internet and other sources. Have fun while improving your speaking skills!

Prerequisite(s): ITAL107

ITAL 211: Italian Reading & Composition (Credits: 3)

Riccarda Saggese

Let the masters of the Italian short story teach you how to write! This course emphasizes vocabulary acquisition and written expression. Students will read and discuss short works of literature and film. You will improve your writing skills, add to your rich stock of conversation topics in Italian, and begin your love affair with contemporary Italian authors.

Counts as Group A requirement

Prerequisite(s): Ital 200, Ital205, or Ital206

ITAL 300-010/080: Advanced Italian Composition and Grammar (Credits: 3)

Riccarda Saggese

In this course students will practice, apply and enhance the language skills used in previous classes through a variety of writing projects (i.e., summaries, opinion papers, narrations, feature articles, descriptions) and class participation.

Prerequisite(s): Ital 211or Ital 212

ITAL 305: Advanced Italian Conversation and Composition (Credits: 3)

Giorgio Melloni

This course teaches Italian conversation and composition through a variety of materials: Italian newspaper and magazine short articles, film, Internet research, etc. The themes of the course are content-based and will explore the crucial importance of the diverse cultural local culture of regions and dialects for contemporary Italian identity in the age of globalization. Emphasis is on improving conversational fluency, pronunciation, vocabulary, and listening comprehension skills as well as writing skills.

Prerequisite(s): ITAL211 or ITAL212

ITAL 310-010/080: Survey of Italian Literature (Credits: 3)

Meredith Ray

You enjoy the language, you are interested in Italian culture, and Italy fascinates you. You are now ready to explore Italy’s literary past and acquaint yourself with some of the country’s great masters and masterpieces. Through the study of selected works and authors, you will also gain a better understanding of Italy’s history and culture. This course will be taught through a combination of informal lectures and discussion.

Prerequisite(s): ITAL 211 or ITAL 212

ITAL 355: The Modern Italian Novel (Credits: 3)

Giorgio Melloni

This course provides an in-depth study of some of the most important Italian novels produced during the 19th and 20th century.  The course will trace the evolution of the Italian Novel, from the Romantic age to the early 20th Century, and define its relationship to other European literatures and its indubitable contribution to the idea of Western Modernity.  The course will also investigate how these novels improved, or simply changed, the native tradition of the genre, and how such works reflect the vast political, economic, social and cultural transformations undergone by the new Italian nation (born in 1861).

Prerequisite(s): One 300-level course

ITAL 455-010/080: Contemporary Italy (Credits: 3)

Giorgio Melloni

Is Italy nowadays mainly a country of art preservation or a living culture between past and future?  Can Italian be considered a “Language of Culture” par excellence? This course will answer these questions, while guiding the students through an examination of contemporary Italian culture and society considered in its following expressions: Politics, Art, Theater, Music, Fashion, and Cinema.  The course will provide students with several opportunities to enhance their communication skills.  Honors students must complete an additional presentation along with an additional research paper

Prerequisite(s): Any two ITAL 3xx courses

ITAL 455: The Art of Translation (Credits: 3)

Laura Salsini

This course offers students an opportunity to improve their writing and comprehension skills by working closing with traditional texts (short stories, plays, and poetry) as well as non-traditional texts (promotional materials, web pages, song lyrics).  Students will translate from English to Italian and Italian to English.

Prerequisite(s): Two 300-level courses

JAPN 204-010/080: The Art of Japanese Calligraphy (Credits: 3)

Chika Inoue

This is an introductory course in the art of Shodo, Japanese calligraphy. Students will learn the esthetics and styles of traditional calligraphy through exposure to works done by masters and develop basic brush technique through rigorous practice. Once the rudimentary technique is mastered, students will move on to Japanese Kana poems, such as haiku and tanka, and Chinese Kanji poems. Abstract shodo is also explored.

Note: Students must purchase their own supplies.

Prerequisite(s): JAPN 105 or knowledge of Chinese characters.

JAPN 201-010/080: Advanced Intermediate Japanese I (Credits: 3)

Mutsuko Sato

This course covers the first six chapters of Genki II text book. Students learn to use various grammatical forms to convey different nuances.  Classes are conducted mostly in Japanese.  Activities include oral, reading and writing exercises on various topics. About 90 additional Kanji will be introduced.

Textbook & Workbook: Genki II (Chapters 14-18)

Prerequisite(s): JAPN 107

JAPN 201: Advanced Intermediate Japanese I (Credits: 3)

Mutsuko Sato

This course covers Chapters 14 through 18 of Genki II text book.  Students learn to use various grammatical forms to convey different nuances.  Classes are conducted mostly in Japanese.  Activities include oral, reading and writing exercises on various topics. About 90 additional Kanji will be introduced.

Prerequisite(s): JAPN107Textbook & Workbook: Genki II (Chapters 14-18)

JAPN 202-010/080: Advanced Intermediate Japanese II (Credits: 3)

Chika Inoue

This course covers the last five chapters of Genki II text book. Students learn to use various grammatical forms to convey different nuances. Classes are conducted in Japanese. Activities include oral presentations and essays on various topics. About 75 additional Kanji will be introduced.

Textbook & Workbook: Genki II (Chapters 19-23)

Prerequisite(s): JAPN201 or 206

JAPN 202: Advanced Intermediate Japanese II (Credits: 3)

Chika Inoue

This course covers the last five chapters of Genki II textbook. Students learn to use various grammatical forms to convey different nuances. Classes are conducted in Japanese. Activities include oral presentations and essays on various topics. About 75 additional Kanji will be introduced.

Fulfills College of Arts and Sciences Group C: Social and Behavioral Science

 

Prerequisite(s): JAPN 201 or 206Textbook & Workbook: Genki II (Chapters 19-23)

JAPN 301-010/080: Advanced Japanese Grammar (Credits: 3)

Mutsuko Sato

This is a course designed for students who want to achieve a higher level of fluency. The goal is a more natural and native-like use of the language, both in written and oral forms.  New grammatical forms, idiomatic and set phrases, Kanji, and vocabulary are introduced. Topics include Japanese geography, technology, foods, pop culture, and education system. There is a final project designed by each student.

Textbook: TOBIRA: Gateway to Advanced Japanese (Chapters 1,3,5,7)

Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of three 200-level Japanese courses or equivalent

JAPN 355: Introduction to Japanese Literature (Credits: 3)

Rachel Hutchinson

This course explores the format and conventions of the Japanese short story, comparing them to the format and conventions of haiku and the novel or shōsetsu. Students are exposed to a large amount of Japanese text in the original, learning vocabulary with which to discuss literature using the Japanese language. Students practice literary analysis through informal class discussion, a short oral presentation, and a written essay. Students learn to appreciate the rhythms and nuances of literary Japanese through class discussion as well as through translation.

We will begin with some short stories by the famous contemporary writer Murakami Haruki. After Spring Break we will take advantage of the cherry blossom season to study haiku poetry and compose some of our own. Towards the end of the course we will read some work by Natsume Sōseki, taking note of the difference between modern literary style and that of the Meiji period (1868-1912). Murakami Haruki is sometimes seen as the ‘modern Sōseki’, so we will explore the similarities and differences between these two authors.

Prerequisite(s): JAPN201, 202 and one of JAPN200/206/209, or instructor’s permission., This course may be repeated for students who transfer credits from a study abroad program.

JAPN 405: Translation Theory and Practice: Modern Japanese Literature (Credits: 3)

Rachael Hutchinson

This course explores both the process of translation and the nature of Japanese literature. As well as translating excerpts from Nagai Kafū’s Furansu monogatari (1909), a text currently unavailable in English, students will also have the opportunity to compare the text and writing style to other works of Meiji literature. Students will discuss major issues involved in translating a literary text from Japanese to English, including the effect of synonym choice, literal versus loose translation, poetic license and the tense-aspect controversy. Students will also gain an appreciation for writing style in terms of sentence construction, kanji use, poetic language and the effect of literary quotation. Students will improve and polish their translation skills to a high degree, and will be encouraged to find their own method of translation, balancing creative expression with accuracy and fidelity to the original text. Throughout the course we will read and discuss translation theory, using the popular translation memoir Found in Translation by Nataly Kelly and Jost Zetzsche as well as articles by Rebecca Copeland and others.

Prerequisite(s): Two JAPN 3XX classes.

JAPN 455-010: Japan Today (Credits: 3)

Chika Inoue

This course builds on work the students have done at the 300-level and continue with the textbook Tobira. In addition, students will practice skills such as reading and translation using a combination of magazine and news article, both digital and print. This section does NOT satisfy the literature requirement for Japanese Studies Major.

Textbook: TOBIRA: Gateway to Advanced Japanese

Prerequisite(s): Two 300-level JAPN courses

JAPN 490: Capstone Thesis (Credits: 3)

Rachael Hutchinson

This course fulfills the capstone requirement for the Japanese Major concentration, and should be taken in the senior year. Students undertake a research thesis in Japanese that will be organized into manageable stages, including research proposal, hypothesis and argument, as well as bibliography and citation. Class time will focus on research methods and presentations, as well as language use in academic written work. One-to-one supervision will also help the student to express their ideas clearly in this medium.

Prerequisite(s): Advisor’s approval.

LATN 201-010/080: Intermediate Latin Prose (Credits: 3)

Marcaline Boyd

This course offers an introduction to the funerary inscription and first-person record of the life and accomplishments of Rome’s first emperor Augustus. We will read Augustus’ official autobiography Res Gestae Divi Augustus (“the achievements of the Divine Augustus”) and corresponding passages from other ancient sourcesWe will devote attention to the historical, cultural, and monumental contexts in which the text was composed and displayed, as well as to the review of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary covered in LATN 101 and 102.

LATN 202: Intermediate Latin Poetry (Credits: 3)

Marcaline Boyd

This course is a study of Latin poetry in the original. We will read a selection of excerpts from some of Rome’s finest poets: Catullus, Virgil’s Aeneid, and Ovid’s Amores. As we explore poems that reveal aspects of life, love, and politics at the end of the Roman Republic and dawn of the Empire, we will focus on the historical, literary, and cultural contexts of these works and their respective authors. This course, along with LATN101, LATN102, and LATN201, fulfills the foreign language requirement of the College of Arts and Sciences.

LATN 301/401-010/080: Advanced Intermediate Latin Prose (Credits: 3)

Marcaline Boyd

In this course, we will look at the development of Latin biography through the works of Cornelius Nepos and Suetonius, its place in the Roman intellectual tradition, and its interaction with the evolving ideologies of the Roman Empire. Latin biography combines insightful political history, scintillating tales of decadence and debauchery at the Roman imperial court, and intriguing meditations on tyranny. Through reading and interpreting these texts with attention to structure, style, and content, this course also develops the advanced student’s Latin.

Prerequisite(s): PREREQ for LATN 301: LATN201 and/or LATN 202 or equivalent or higher. The Honors section meets with the regular section.PREREQ for LATN 401: LATN301 and/or LATN302 or equivalent or higher. The Honors section meets with the regular section. RESTRICTIONS: Meets with LATN301.

LLCU 100-010: Essential Foreign Language: Russian for Military Purposes (Credits: 1)

Alexander Selimov

No prior knowledge of Russian is required for this basic course designed to provide students with an introduction to military-related terminology and Russian culture. Students will gain confidence in their ability to convey and receive basic information in Russian in order to function effectively in a variety of target situations. Learn to read, write, and pronounce the Russian alphabet while building vocabulary essential to the military and political professions.  Topics include countries and nationalities, ranks, military transport, weaponry, parts of the body, first aid, food, rations, geographical terms, and signs. General discussion of important Russian social norms, culture, customs, and military history will lead students toward a better understanding of the Russian mindset, which is so important within today’s political context.

Prerequisite(s): None

LLCU 316-010/080: Gods, Heroes & Monsters (Credits: 3)

Tyson Sukava

The subject of Classical Greek and Roman mythology is a broad one, and this course will focus on myth as presented primarily in the medium of epic poetry. The course commences with Hesiod’s account of the birth of the Greek gods and goddesses and moves next to the most famous myth of all, the tale of the rape of Helen and the fall of Troy. Particular emphasis will be placed on the possible historical reality of the Trojan myth and on Homer’s depictions of the gods and heroes who participated in this saga. From Homer’s warrior hero Achilles and the wanderings of Odysseus, we will proceed to the strange Hellenistic Greek tale of Jason, the witch Medea, and the quest for the golden fleece. The remainder of the course will be dedicated to Roman myths and adaptations of Greek material. On the syllabus is Virgil’s Aeneid, the story of the Trojan Aeneas and his wanderings to Italy, where he will become the founder of the Roman race. Here emphasis will be placed on the new politicizing of myth and the manipulation of myth for propagandistic purposes. Next the bold and sacrilegious Metamorphoses of Ovid will be studied; here the familiar Homeric gods become something quite undeserving of respect and worship. The course will close with what is perhaps the strangest of all tales, the story of the “hero” Lucius who becomes, quite literally, an ass and a devotee of the seductive Egyptian goddess Isis.

Prerequisite(s): Satisfies Group A “Creative Arts & Humanities

LLCU 316: Gods, Heroes, and Monsters: Classical Mythology (Credits: 3)

Margaret Laird

This course focuses on cosmological myths and heroic sagas in the literature and art of Greece and Rome. The course commences with the birth of the Greek gods and goddesses and moves next to the most famous myth of all, the tale of the rape of Helen and the fall of Troy. Particular emphasis will be placed on the possible historical reality of the Trojan myth and on the gods and heroes who participated in this saga. From the warrior hero Achilles and the wanderings of Odysseus, we will proceed to the strange tale of Jason, the witch Medea, and the quest for the golden fleece.

The remainder of the course will be dedicated to Roman myths and adaptations of Greek material. On the syllabus is Virgil’s Aeneid, the story of the Trojan Aeneas and his wanderings to Italy, where he will become the founder of the Roman race. Here emphasis will be placed on the new politicizing of myth and the manipulation of myth for propagandistic purposes. Next the bold and sacrilegious Metamorphoses of Ovid will be studied.

This course satisfies Group A

LLCU 320-010/080: Berlin in Literature and Film (Credits: 3)

Ester Riehl

The city of Berlin stands at the center of Germany’s political and social turmoil of the last two centuries. Its architecture remains a physical symbol of Prussia’s rise to power and still contains remnants of Hitler’s mad plans for a German Empire. The wall that cut the city in half became the central symbol of the Cold War, and after it fell the city rose again to become today’s multicultural capital of a reunited Germany. This course examines the history and image of Berlin these turbulent times. A focus on literary texts, films, photographs and paintings produced and set in Berlin will offer insight into the life of this vibrant city.

Students will write 5 short essays as well as midterm and final exams.

Honors students will read one additional text (to be decided by student and professor) and then write about that text in a sixth essay.

Prerequisite(s): Satisfies Group A “Creative Arts & Humanities”

LLCU 320: Thrillers, Chillers and Killers (Credits: 3)

Judy Celli

In this interdisciplinary course, students will be able to apply knowledge acquired from their major fields of study to the interpretation of events and the analysis of characters in 19th century French short stories of the Fantastic genre.  Setting the stories in relation to recent advances made in the fields of biology, psychology, neuroscience and criminology may open up new interpretations.  Theories such as the Multiverse Hypothesis, underdeveloped amygdalae, genetics and neurological impulses may shed a contemporary light on the acts perpetrated by characters in the stories.   In addition to studying traditional analytical approaches to the genre, students will apply their personal base of knowledge thus gaining a fresh and dynamic cognizance of literature.

LLCU 321-010/080: Anti-Heroes in Modern Chinese Literature (Credits: 3)

Jianguo Chen

This course introduces students to the image of anti-heroes in modern Chinese literature, a counter-tradition endemic to the heroic discourse in the main stream of Confucian orthodoxy and the ideology of socialism. Through studying the literary representation of various types of anti-heroes: the aesthete, the self-abandoned, the marginal woman, the estranged, the defeated, the superfluous, the social outcast, etc., the course examines the trajectory of a modern anti-hero literature, one that was born of modern Chinese writers’ endeavor to search for an individual “self” vis-à-vis a collective identity. The course demonstrates how the sociopolitical conditions of modern China have shaped this anti-hero literature and how societal transformations have yielded value alternatives. The comparative perspective the course adopts will enable students to have a better understanding of how the literary representation of anti-heroes is historicized and contextualized. Selected films will be shown to complement and enhance such study.

Prerequisite(s): The course satisfies Group A requirements.

LLCU 330: Martial Arts, Chinese Herbal Medicine, and the Embodiment of Femininity: The Ancient Chinese Civilization and Its Modern Impact (Credits: 3)

Maria Tu

This course focuses on the ancient origins of the Chinese intellectual traditions, not in a way that explains how they inform the philosophical discourses, but how they ground Chinese cultural assumptions and condition the way the Chinese live their everyday lives. It is these prevailing cultural assumptions that underlie various cultural practices over the past 3000 years up until modern day: traditional Chinese medicine, acupuncture, martial arts (Tai Chi and Qi Gong), Feng Shui, visual arts such as calligraphy and painting, and a more modern form of performing art: film. The ancient cultural origin is also a feminine source, paralleling the pre-historical Chinese matriarchal society and the Yin force in the Yin/Yang cosmic model.

In this course, students will first study the Yin/Yang cosmic forces embedded in I Ching, or The Book of Changes, presumably the oldest of the Chinese classics, which has significantly influenced and shaped the Chinese way of thinking. Students will learn the ancient Shang/Zhou cultures (1600 – 700 BC) and compare them with other ancient civilizations in the world: Babylonian, Egyptian, and Greek.  Secondly, Students will study how the ancient “Chinese mind” or “Chineseness” over the past three millennia as a kind of Jungian collective unconsciousness casts impact on billions of modern Chinese in their personal conduct, social maneuvers, and nutritional care. Lectures and movies will be offered to explain how ancient legacies are ingrained into the mindset of modern-day Chinese instantiated in the forms of acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine, Feng Shui, martial art, art, and social networks.  In-class demonstrations will be provided by invited experts in acupuncture, martial arts, and traditional Chinese medicine.  Selected movies will be shown to complement and enhance such study.

LLCU 331: Love, Death, and Gender in Chinese Films (Credits: 3)

Jianguo Chen

This course introduces students to Chinese culture/society through the cinematic perspective, and acquaints them with a knowledge of Chinese film aesthetic and film making. The course fulfills Multicultural requirements and counts towards Chinese Minor and East Asian Studies Major.

LLCU 333-010/080: “Israeli Film – Reflecting Dramatic Change” – taught in English (Credits: 3)

Eynat Gutman

To die or not to die (for your country)?

This course studies fascinating topics in Israeli film, such as the Construction and Deconstruction of the heroic Israeli Sabra, and Ethnic Groups in Israel.  Israeli Film encompasses decades of change and development in Israeli society.  Discussion intensive.

                                               

Prerequisite(s): Satisfies Group B and Multicultural requirements, honors section available!

LLCU 335: Israeli Fiction: Identity, Globalization and Conflict (Credits: 3)

Eynat Gutman

Through analysis of leading Israeli authors’ literary works, we explore major themes pertaining to Israeli society’s contemporary character.   Surveyed topics include Zionism and post-Zionism; Globalization; Jewish and non-Jewish citizens of Israel; Terrorism and its effects on national life.  A couple of films may be integrated to further the understanding of these themes.

This course satisfies the Multicultural requirement (both sections) as well as the Second Writing requirement (section 011).  The course is taught in English.

LLCU 338: Light and Shadow – Japanese Films (Credits: 3)

Rachael Hutchinson

This course examines Japanese films of the twentieth century, from benshi-related silent films through to cel and CGI animation.  Topics for discussion will include wartime and occupation censorship, the visuality of violence, and discourses of adaptation and the remake.  Major genres studied will include the samurai movie and its relationship to Hollywood, the 1970s yakuza film and its modern incarnation in the films of Takeshi Kitano, and the animated films of the 1990s that explore human identity in terms of cybernetic and other mutations.

This course satisfies Group A

Offered - Fall 2017

LLCU 350-010: Introduction to Game Studies (Credits: 3)

Phillip Penix-Tadsen

Contributes to Game Studies Minor, University Breadth Requirement Group A, CAS Group A, Multicultural Course

This course aims to acquaint students with the major genres of videogames produced around the world, as well as the major critical approaches taken by academics to the study of those games. Issues for discussion include the dominance of console platforms in some markets (e.g. Japan) as opposed to online or PC gaming in others (e.g. Korea, North America); different approaches to difficulty, ethics and violence in games; and problematic representations of gender and race in specific game texts. We will examine theoretical terms like ‘immersion’ and ‘identification’ and see how these apply to different styles of play. We will examine the role of graphics and dimensionality in immersion, especially the effect of increasingly realistic environments. During this course, students will be expected to log a certain number of hours playing game examples from different genres in the Games Lab in Morris Library.

Cultural Code: Video Games and Latin America (MIT Press, 2016)  

LLCU 375-010/080: Topics in Russian and Soviet Culture: Tempting Fate- Duels and Deals (Credits: 3)

Julia Hulings

Everyone has heard of “Russian roulette”; Germans coined the term after observing bored Russian soldiers participating in the dangerous game.  Indeed, the idea of tempting fate is quite Russian; one scholar identifies a cultural propensity that deems it “more attractive and ethical to spend, waste, and lose, rather than save, keep, and retain.”  Couple this live-for-today attitude with macho pride and social rank, and you get the pervasive risk-taking behavior that permeates 19th and early 20th century Russian literature.   Pushkin’s “Queen of Spades” and Dostoevsky’s The Gambler faithfully reflect the obsessions and dangers of such risk, with the latter ironically written in a hurry to cover the author’s own gambling debt.  We find a pompous recklessness, but with pistols, in Lermontov’s Hero of Our Time, Chekhov’s The Duel and in Pushkin’s Eugene Onegin. Pushing one’s luck also leads to the devil himself in Kuprin’s Star of Solomon, and Bulgakov’s Master and Margarita. Come read the masters and explore the “rolling of the dice” in Russian and Soviet culture!

Honors credit and Second Writing available.

Satisfies Group B “History and Cultural Change”

Prerequisite(s): None

LLCU 420/620-010/080: To Hell and Back: Dante’s Divine Comedy and the Medieval World (Credits: 3)

Meredith Ray

Dante’s masterpiece, the Divine Comedy, is a true encyclopedia of medieval learning and culture. In this course we will read selections from it that bring into focus the history and culture of the Medieval Mediterranean world. Our readings and discussion will touch on many areas, from the historical and political context in which Dante worked and the poetic traditions that influenced him, to the influence of non-Christian civilizations on his thought and medieval views on women. In addition to close readings of selected poems, we will examine visual representations and interpretations of Dante’s work, from illuminated manuscripts to recent films. Students will hone their critical thinking skills while developing the tools necessary for perceptive literary and cultural analysis. All readings, discussion and written work will be in English. Students wishing to read the work in Italian may discuss this with the professor.

LLCU 421/621: Methods of Teaching Foreign Language (Credits: 3)

Cynthia Lees

Methods of Teaching Foreign Language addresses both the theory and practice of teaching a modern language and includes reflecting upon and discussing assigned readings in the text in order to promote communicative language teaching (CLT) and task-based instruction. The goal of this methods course is to provide strategies and techniques for effective teaching in the target language and to actualize a variety of hands-on experiences that will contribute to your growth as a professional educator. These hands-on experiences include teaching a vocabulary and a grammar lesson in the target language. Primarily a course for student teacher candidates, the class may also be taken by language majors who are currently enrolled in 400-level or 600-level classes.

LLCU 424-010: Second Language Testing (Credits: 3)

Thomas McCone

The rise of the communicative language classroom has led to the inevitable question of how to assess student linguistic competence both overall and at the level of specific content units.   In this course we will examine what assessment techniques are available to language teachers and how such techniques might ultimately be integrated into communicative language teaching.  In the process, we hope to provide future language teachers with the knowledge and skills required to develop a variety of classroom assessment methods.  Participants will learn how to implement multiple formal and informal techniques to evaluate their students’ progress, and how to use test results to improve instruction.

LLCU 429/629: Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages in the Elementary Schools (Credits: 3)

Iris Busch

Have you ever asked yourself why children have a reputation for being natural language learners? Languages and children are a perfect match. Children like to explore, are eager to express themselves and quickly embrace different languages and cultures. Every skill and outcome that is important to society is introduced through the elementary school curriculum. Foreign languages must have a secure place in the K-8 curriculum. The course will highlight the principles and strategies for teaching languages to children with their distinctive characteristics and needs. Focus is on Standards based curriculum design and lesson planning, classroom management, and advocacy. There will be games, songs and chants. And of course: Stories.

Practical experiences include teaching and observing at the University’s Early Learning Center.

LLCU 622: Language Syllabus and Materials Development (Credits: 3)

Jorge Cubillos

Wondering how to select a textbook, or how to put together the syllabus for your next language course? Interested in creating your own teaching materials? This course will give you the opportunity to learn about the latest approaches to syllabus and materials design, while giving you extensive hands-on experience in the creation of your own classroom tasks and homework assignments.

Note: Special emphasis will be given to the enhancement of your proficiency in the use of technology for the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

LLCU 623-010: Theoretical and Practical Issues in Foreign Language Pedagogy (Credits: 3)

Ali Alalou

Graduate assistants enrolled in this course will study current perspectives on foreign language instruction and have extensive hands-on experience with the implementation of effective language teaching strategies.  Emphasis will be given to the enhancement of students’ proficiency in class planning, syllabus design and materials preparation.

Prerequisite(s): Graduate students only

LLCU 624-010: Second Language Testing (Credits: 3)

Jorge Cubillos

This course is designed to provide future language teachers with the knowledge and skills required to develop a variety of classroom assessment methods.  Participants will learn how to implement multiple formal and informal techniques to evaluate their students’ progress, and how to use test results to improve instruction.   Special emphasis will be given to the design of comprehensive assessment plans for specific thematic units.

LLCU 626-010: Seminar on Second Language Acquisition Research (Credits: 3)

Jorge Cubillos

This course is an in-depth exploration of topics pertaining to the acquisition of a second or additional language. Class readings and assignments will provide students with an introduction to quantitative and qualitative research methods in applied linguistics. Emphasis is given to the development of independent study, problem-solving, research, reading, writing and oral presentation skills.

Note: This course is highly recommended for students planning to write a Master’s thesis, and for those preparing for their comprehensive examination in Foreign Language Pedagogy.

PORT 216-010: Intensive Brazilian Portuguese for Spanish Students and Speakers (Credits: 3)

Cynthia Schmidt-Cruz

Study the language of Brazil and unlock the door to this exciting giant of South America.  Learning Brazilian Portuguese may not change your life, but then again, maybe it will.  Why take a chance?

Due to their similarities in structure and vocabulary, your knowledge of Spanish will put you on the fast track to learning Portuguese. In this intensive course you can expect to gain a good functional knowledge of this language, which is spoken by 236 million people. You will also learn about Brazilian culture, and Brazilian popular music will be incorporated into our lessons to reinforce language learning. Come prepared to groove to Bossa Nova and other Brazilian rhythms, and to have fun learning a really cool language!

Why you should study Portuguese

Note: As a beginning language course, PORT 216 is not intended for native or heritage speakers of Portuguese.

PORT 216 is part of Option II of the Spanish major and can count toward the Latin American and Iberian Studies major and minor. It is also part of the Foreign Language Certificate in Brazilian Portuguese. Portuguese can be used as Language Three for the Three Language Major. Additionally, this course helps students prepare for the winter session in Brazil where they can continue studying Portuguese.

Prerequisite(s): One 300-level Spanish course or equivalent, or being a native or heritage speaker of Spanish.

PORT 316: Intensive Portuguese for Spanish Students II (Credits: 3)

Cynthia Schmidt-Cruz

PORT316 is a continuation of PORT216. Students will continue to refine their command of the four language skills—listening, speaking, reading, and writing—and will complete the study of the basic grammatical structure of Brazilian Portuguese. As in PORT216, there will be an emphasis on Brazilian culture through films, Power Point presentations, readings, and plenty of Brazilian music.

Once again, come prepared to groove to the rhythm and lyrics of samba and bossa nova, to speak lots of Portuguese, and to have a lot of fun learning a really cool language!

The PORT 216-316 sequence fulfills the requirement for language 3 of the Three Language major. Also, PORT 316 is part of Option II of the Spanish major and can count toward the Latin American and Iberian Studies major and minor.  It is also part of the Foreign Language Certificate in Brazilian Portuguese.

Prerequisite(s): PORT 216 or equivalent.

RUSS 200: Russian Grammar Review (Credits: 3)

Natallia Cherashneva

Continue your study of Russian at the 200 level, expanding on the knowledge and developing the skills acquired over previous semesters of study.  Students will practice listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Russian through a variety of activities, following the continued adventures of Tanya, Misha, and Co in the second half of the outstanding textbook Welcome Back.  At the same time, you will systematically review and complete your study of the fundamentals of Russian grammar, building a solid foundation for further mastery of the language.  All 300-level and 400-level Russian courses will build on what we cover here.

NOTE: RUSS 200 is designed to be taken in conjunction with RUSS 211; for Russian Studies majors, minors, and Three-Language majors this course is a necessary part of the course sequence that fully prepares students for the 300-level.

Prerequisite(s): RUSS107 or equivalent

RUSS 211: Russian Reading and Composition: Short Fiction (Credits: 3)

Natallia Cherashneva

Read entertaining and interesting 20th-century Russian short stories from a variety of genres (detective fiction, satire, tales of adventure, children’s literature) to improve your reading skills and expand your vocabulary. Discussions will help you improve your speaking and listening skills, while writing exercises will facilitate your mastery of the material and develop your skills in composition. Designed to be taken at the same time as RUSS 200, this course will strengthen your grasp of the grammar covered in that course while allowing you to focus on reading techniques and the construction of the complex Russian sentence.  Taking the two courses together will enable you to make a significant and leap forward in learning the language. Honors credit available.

NOTE: RUSS 211 is designed to be taken in conjunction with RUSS 200; for Russian Studies majors, minors, and Three-Language majors this course is a necessary part of the course sequence that fully prepares students for the 300-level.

Fulfills Group A

Prerequisite(s): RUSS 200, if not taken simultaneously with RUSS 200.

RUSS 325-010/080: Russian Civilization and Culture (Credits: 3)

Julia Hulings

Culture is a system of ideas expressed in linguistic, religious, literary, artistic, social, scientific, and technological forms, fleshed out by creative people. Some of these ideas are constants that persist through change, while others are variable. This course will identify and explore what it means to be “Russian” through such topics as marriage and dating, family life, cuisine, traditions and behaviors, the dacha and banya, environmental concerns, and art. These cultural categories are illustrated through journal and newspaper articles, the work of various Russian writers and artists, and other authentic visual and written materials such as menus, maps, and photographs. This course will deepen students’ understanding of Russia’s past, present, and future while improving their mastery of both written and spoken Russian. In order to better understand the complex nature of the culture of such a huge country, oral reports will address the other major ethnic groups in Russia (which compose approximately 20% of the population) and their approaches to the unit topics.

Prerequisite(s): RUSS 200 or 211Satisfies Group B and Multicultural RequirementHonors Credit Available

RUSS 401-010/080: Advanced Russian Grammar and Composition (Credits: 3)

Victoria Finney

What do you want to know about Russian grammar but are afraid to ask? Come fill in the gaps!  Continue to develop the expression of your own opinions in clear, colloquial standard Russian through advanced exercises in Russian grammar, syntax, and word usage.  Special attention will be paid to participial constructions, gerunds, verbs of motion, aspect, prepositions and word order, with an emphasis on word formation as essential to vocabulary building.  Explore this grammar through an examination of key aspects of contemporary Russian education, politics, ecology, and perception of the U.S. through authentic readings from contemporary sources with related listening, speaking, and writing activities.  This course will answer many of your unanswered questions about Russian; no stone will be left unturned!

Prerequisite(s): Any 300-level RUSS course

RUSS 440: Dystopia in Russian and Soviet Fiction (Credits: 3)

Julia Hulings

The Russian writer Evgenij Zamyatin depicts a future “world of square roots of minus one” in his banned novel We, written as a response to the October Revolution and its aftermath.  Scholars agree that this early sci-fi dystopia influenced H G Wells and his 1984, however the roots of science fiction in Russia reach back to the late 18th century when contact with European ways of life were truly established. The utopian “Dream, Happy Society” of 1759 starts our journey with its prophetic proposal of separation of church and state.  As we enter the 19th century, Dostoevsky’s provides a depiction of an untenable utopia in “Dream of a Ridiculous Man,” and Odoevsky’s “Town Without a Name” shows the negative results of scientific rejection of ethics.

This theme continues into the 20th century in Kuprin’s “Toast” set in the year 2905, when universal harmony is not all it was intended to be, and in Valery Bryusov’s “Republic of the Southern Cross,” where we see the consequences of dictatorship versus basic human desire. Our exploration of the 20th century will include We and grim stories by the Strugatsky Brothers, credited with reestablishing sci-fi after the Khrushchev Thaw. What we dream of and what we can have may be two entirely different things, and even with the most careful attention to logic and reason, things can go very wrong. Honors credit is available.

Prerequisite(s): one 300-level RUSS courseAvailable for Honors credit.

SPAN 200: Spanish Composition and Grammar (Credits: 3)

Hans-Jörg BuschCarmen FinnicumLee GlenFatima Haq

An intensive study of selected grammatical topics (ser-estar, preterit and imperfect, present subjunctive and commands); vocabulary; grammatical exercises and short compositions. Offered with an Honors section (080).

In this course you will acquire new vocabulary, broaden and improve your knowledge of grammatical structures (agreement, verb tenses, pronouns, and much more). You will learn strategies for developing and refining your written communication skills.

Prerequisite(s): SPAN 107Offered with an Honors section (080)

SPAN 200: Spanish Composition and Grammar (Credits: 3)

Jörg Busch, Fatima Haq, Carmen Finnicum, Stacey Hendrix, Ruth Toole

An intensive study of selected grammatical topics (ser-estar, preterite and imperfect, present subjunctive and commands); vocabulary; grammatical exercises and short compositions. Offered with an Honors section (080).

In this course you will acquire new vocabulary, broaden and improve your knowledge of grammatical structures (agreement, verb tenses, pronouns, and much more). You will learn strategies for developing and refining your written communication skills.

Prerequisite(s): SPAN 107

SPAN 201-080/085: Spanish Reading & Composition (HONORS) (Credits: 3)

Susan McKennaMeghan McInnis-Dominguez

This course, for HONORS students, places major emphasis on the development of reading, writing and analytical skills while studying literary works from Spain and Latin America in three genres: poetry, narrative and drama. In-class discussion and compositions will be based on interpretation of the readings and will be directed towards reinforcing the use of literary terminology.  Other highlights included in this course are weekly discussion threads through Canvas, memorization of poems, and a short drama performance.

Prerequisite(s): SPAN 200. Fulfills Group "A" requirement

SPAN 201: Spanish Reading & Composition (HONORS) (Credits: 3)

Susan McKenna

This course, for HONORS students, places major emphasis on the development of reading, writing and analytical skills while studying literary works from Spain and Latin America in three genres: poetry, narrative and drama. In-class discussion and compositions will be based on interpretation of the readings and will be directed towards reinforcing the use of literary terminology.  Other highlights included in this course are weekly discussion threads through Canvas, memorization of poems, and a short drama performance.

Prerequisite(s): SPAN 200, Fulfills Group "A" requirement

SPAN 201: Spanish Reading & Composition (Credits: 3)

Lee Glen, Meghan McInnis-Dominguez, Susan McKenna, Gladys Ilarregui

This course places major emphasis on the development of reading, writing and analytical skills while studying literary selections from Spain and Latin America.

In this course the student has the opportunity to read a wide variety of Spanish and Latin American literature in three genres: poetry, narrative and drama. The student will develop reading skills as well as a solid knowledge of the literary terms and movements which will be encountered in more advanced literature classes. Compositions will be based on interpretation of the readings and will be directed towards reinforcing the use of literary terminology.

This class may contain a section with an Honors component. Honors students may be asked to participate in weekly discussion threads through Canvas, memorization of poems, and/or a short drama performance.

Prerequisite(s): SPAN 200. Fulfills Group "A" requirement

SPAN 201: Spanish Reading & Composition (Credits: 3)

Jesus Botello, Lee Glen, Meghan McInnis-Dominguez, Susan McKenna

This course places major emphasis on the development of reading, writing and analytical skills while studying literary selections from Spain and Latin America.

In this course the student has the opportunity to read a wide variety of Spanish and Latin American literature in three genres: poetry, narrative and drama. The student will develop reading skills as well as a solid knowledge of the literary terms and movements which will be encountered in more advanced literature classes. Compositions will be based on interpretation of the readings and will be directed towards reinforcing the use of literary terminology.

This class may contain a section with an Honors component. Honors students may be asked to participate in weekly discussion threads through Canvas, memorization of poems, and/or a short drama performance.

Prerequisite(s): SPAN 200, Fulfills Group "A" requirement

SPAN 205: Spanish Conversation: A Cultural Approach (Credits: 3)

Joan BrownCarmen FinnicumKrystyna Musik

This course is designed to build mastery of practical spoken Spanish in its cultural context. The language will be used strategically – to accomplish objectives and resolve conflicts – in situations that relate to everyday life. Linguistic and cultural topics include travel, relationships, food, health, education, sports, entertainment, housing, and jobs. An array of proven language-learning methodologies will be used to build competence. These include role-playing activities, vocabulary expansion, cultural readings, films, oral reports, Internet research, listening activities, pronunciation practice, grammar repair and review, short compositions, and an individual final project. The Honors section features additional mastery activities inside and outside the classroom.

Prerequisite(s): Spanish 107 with a grade of B, Not intended for native speakers, May not be taken if the student has reached the 400 level in Spanish.

SPAN 205: Spanish Conversation: A Cultural Approach (Credits: 3)

Persephone Braham, Carmen Finnicum, Aurelia Rio

This course is designed to build mastery of practical spoken Spanish in its cultural context. The language will be used strategically – to accomplish objectives and resolve conflicts – in situations that relate to everyday life. Linguistic and cultural topics include travel, relationships, food, health, education, sports, entertainment, housing, and jobs. An array of proven language-learning methodologies will be used to build competence. These include role-playing activities, vocabulary expansion, cultural readings, films, oral reports, Internet research, listening activities, pronunciation practice, grammar repair and review, short compositions, and an individual final project. The Honors section features additional mastery activities inside and outside the classroom.

Prerequisite(s): Spanish 107 with a grade of B. Restrictions: Not intended for native speakers. May not be taken if the student has reached the 400 level in Spanish.

SPAN 300: Advanced Spanish Composition & Grammar I (Credits: 3)

Lee GlenAsima Saad-Maura

This course is a comprehensive study of basic and complex grammatical structures with both oral and written practice to facilitate further mastery of vocabulary and structures. Cultural topics are explored through readings that raise awareness of the Hispanic world while building up vocabulary to express abstract ideas.

Prerequisite(s): SPAN 200 and SPAN 201

SPAN 300: Advanced Spanish Composition and Grammar I (Credits: 3)

Lee Glen, Ruth Toole

This course is a comprehensive study of basic and complex grammatical structures with both oral and written practice to facilitate further mastery of vocabulary and structures. Cultural topics are explored through readings that raise awareness of the Hispanic world while building up vocabulary to express abstract ideas.

Prerequisite(s): SPAN 200 and SPAN 201

SPAN 301-010: Survey of Medieval and Golden Age literature (Credits: 3)

Cristina Guardiola-Griffiths, Ruth Toole

This course studies the development of Spanish literature from its origins through the 17th century; it is a study of representative works, discussions and collateral readings.

From the epic poem of the Cid to the riotous adventures of Don Quijote, from the sorceress Celestina to the seductions of Don Juan, from the picaresque novel Lazarillo de Tormes to the philosophical drama La vida es sueño, this course will explore the literature and culture of Spain from the Middle Ages through the Golden Age. Students will gain exposure to classic authors in various genres of Spanish literature, honing critical skills while exploring the evolution and development of Spain’s literary genius.

Honor section available.

Prerequisite(s): SPAN 201, Fulfills Arts & Sciences ‘Group B’ requirement

SPAN 302: Survey of Spanish Literature (Credits: 3)

Susan McKenna

This course will cover Spanish literature from the 18th century to the present, including selections of representative works, discussions and collateral readings. In this course we will explore the literature and culture of modern Spain chronologically, from the eighteenth century to the present. We will gain exposure to classic modern authors in every genre of Spanish literature. We also will sample the action, humor, wit and beauty of many other masterpieces, honing critical skills while exploring the evolution of modern Spain. Multimedia enrichment will add to our appreciation of Spanish literature and culture.

Prerequisite(s): SPAN 201Fulfills Arts and Sciences ‘Group B’ requirement

SPAN 303: Survey of Spanish-American Literature (Credits: 3)

Persephone Braham, Meghan McInnis-Dominguez, Alexander Selimov

This course is a survey of Latin American Literature from colonial to the 19th Latin American periods. It offers an overview of the most salient moments in Latin American literature, cultural history, placing emphasis on the ways in which specific literary works relate to the social and political developments that have shaped the region.

The course will stress Spanish conversation through debates of the different periods and the knowledge of history and social productions associated with particular texts from the Mayas to the modernist poets. Particular emphasis will be placed in the knowledge of rocks, glyphs and concepts of the pre-Hispanic cultures; material study elaborated through the use of documentaries and other film and digital resources.

Honor section available.

Prerequisite(s): SPAN 201, Fulfills Arts & Sciences ‘Group B’ requirement

SPAN 304: Survey of Spanish-American Literature (Credits: 3)

Persephone BrahamGladys Ilaregui

Representative works in all genres of Latin American literature in the 20th century.

SPAN304 is a survey of Spanish-American literature that covers from the beginning of the 20th century until the most recent literary manifestations. Reading selections (excerpts) of famous writers (including Nobel Prize winners Gabriela Mistral [1945], Pablo Neruda [1973], Gabriel García Márquez [1982], and Mario Vargas Llosa [2010]) will provide a better understanding of a wide variety of peoples, cultures, and societies of those nations that we call Latin America.

Prerequisite(s): SPAN 201

SPAN 305: Oral Communication (Credits: 3)

Jorge Cubillos

For individuals with a comprehensive knowledge of Spanish grammar and vocabulary. Emphasis on refinement of expression of abstract ideas as well as mastery of practical communication.

You love Spanish. You would love to travel to Spanish-speaking countries. You can read Spanish and you can communicate but you want to be able to have meaningful Spanish conversation. This course is designed to help you speak Spanish more fluently and expand your vocabulary while learning current issues and customs in the Hispanic world. The goal is to enable you to sustain conversations and express your opinions on diverse topics. The course draws from a variety of resources, including short stories and essays, articles from the Spanish press, slides, videos, and satellite newscasts. Interactive formats such as class discussions, debates, oral presentations and scenarios will be used.

Prerequisite(s): SPAN 200Restrictions: Not intended for native speakers

SPAN 305: Oral Communication (Credits: 3)

Aurelia Rio

For individuals with a comprehensive knowledge of Spanish grammar and vocabulary. Emphasis on refinement of expression of abstract ideas as well as mastery of practical communication.

You love Spanish. You would love to travel to Spanish-speaking countries. You can read Spanish and you can communicate but you want to be able to have meaningful Spanish conversation. This course is designed to help you speak Spanish more fluently and expand your vocabulary while learning current issues and customs in the Hispanic world. The goal is to enable you to sustain conversations and express your opinions on diverse topics. The course draws from a variety of resources, including short stories and essays, articles from the Spanish press, slides, videos, and satellite newscasts. Interactive formats such as class discussions, debates, oral presentations and scenarios will be used.

Honor section available.

Prerequisite(s): SPAN 200, Restrictions: Not intended for native speakers

SPAN 314-010/080: Spanish Phonetics and Phonology (Credits: 3)

Jörg Busch

This course is highly recommended for prospective Spanish teachers and students who want to improve and practice their pronunciation and intonation in Spanish. The course will help you to understand how the Spanish phonetic system is organized, compared to the system in English. This, together with a wealth of practical exercises will enable you to lose the typical “American accent”, and to speak like a Spaniard. You will learn how to divide Spanish words into syllables, where and when to put written accents, how to pronounce vowels and consonants, as well as learn about Spanish rhythm, intonation, linguistic variation and phonetic transcription.

Honor section available.

SPAN 325: Spanish Civilization and Culture (Credits: 3)

Staff

Survey of geography, history, art and society of Spain. This course offers a survey of the geography, history, culture, politics and society of Spain. You will study key historical events, from prehistoric times to the most recent developments, as well as cultural movements that have shaped Spanish national identity. The course is conducted in Spanish and the readings are in Spanish.

Prerequisite(s): SPAN 200.Fulfills ‘Group B’ Arts & Science requirement.Required for teaching majors.

SPAN 325: Spanish Civilization and Culture (Credits: 3)

Jesús Botello

Survey of geography, history, art and society of Spain. This course offers a survey of the geography, history, culture, politics and society of Spain. You will study key historical events, from prehistoric times to the most recent developments, as well as cultural movements that have shaped Spanish national identity. The course is conducted in Spanish and the readings are in Spanish.

Honor section available.

Prerequisite(s): SPAN 200. Fulfills ‘Group B’ Arts & Science requirement. Required for teaching majors

SPAN 326: Latin American Civilizations and Cultures (Credits: 3)

Aurelia Rio

This course is a survey of the history and culture of Latin America from the time of the region’s indigenous empires to the present. Students will analyze fundamental aspects of the region’s history, geography, politics and cultural production, focusing on issues including human rights, colonialism, nationalism, military intervention, globalization and migration. This course is designed to prepare students for the advanced study of Latin American cultural production by providing them with the historical and social context necessary for studying the cultures of this region. Students will gain an appreciation for the historical roots of present-day social and political issues in Latin America, improve their research and analysis skills, develop their capacity for independent learning and critically examine crucial issues related to Latin American culture.

Prerequisite(s): SPAN 200Fulfills Arts & Sciences ‘Group B’ requirement.

SPAN 326: Latin American Civilizations and Cultures (Credits: 3)

Aurelia Rio, Ruth Toole

This course is a survey of the history and culture of Latin America from the time of the region’s indigenous empires to the present. Students will analyze fundamental aspects of the region’s history, geography, politics and cultural production, focusing on issues including human rights, colonialism, nationalism, military intervention, globalization and migration. This course is designed to prepare students for the advanced study of Latin American cultural production by providing them with the historical and social context necessary for studying the cultures of this region. Students will gain an appreciation for the historical roots of present-day social and political issues in Latin America, improve their research and analysis skills, develop their capacity for independent learning and critically examine crucial issues related to Latin American culture.

Honor section available.

Prerequisite(s): SPAN 200. Fulfills Arts & Sciences ‘Group B’ requirement.

SPAN 401: Advanced Spanish Composition and Grammar II (Credits: 3)

Hans-Jörg BuschAsima Saad-Maura

SPAN401 is not a systematic study of Spanish grammar (that is the purpose of the SPAN 200 and 300 prerequisites for this course). In SPAN401 students will practice and apply what they have learned in previous courses, as well as broaden their vocabulary through different kinds of writings (i.e.: summaries, opinion papers, narrations, feature articles, descriptions, poems, short stories, etc.), projects and class participation. Furthermore, they will have the opportunity to study and practice more in-depth those structures that traditionally cause the most problems: subjunctive vs. indicative, past tenses, prepositions and pronouns, reflexivity, active vs. passive, text progression, determination, word order, direct vs. indirect speech, sequence of tenses, use of complex tenses, etc. The SPAN 401 textbook contains an array of authentic readings about the culture, history, and politics of Spain and Latin America. The overall goal of SPAN 401 is to help students reach the ACTFL Language Testing Advanced-Low Level.

Prerequisite(s): This course is the last in a series of Spanish language courses. Students must have taken SPAN200 and SPAN300 before enrolling for this course. The course is conducted in Spanish.

SPAN 401: Advanced Composition & Grammar II (Credits: 3)

Jörg Busch, Ruth Toole

SPAN401 is not a systematic study of Spanish grammar (that is the purpose of the SPAN 200 and 300 prerequisites for this course). In SPAN401 students will practice and apply what they have learned in previous courses, as well as broaden their vocabulary through different kinds of writings (i.e.: summaries, opinion papers, narrations, feature articles, descriptions, poems, short stories, etc.), projects and class participation. Furthermore, they will have the opportunity to study and practice more in-depth those structures that traditionally cause the most problems: subjunctive vs. indicative, past tenses, prepositions and pronouns, reflexivity, active vs. passive, text progression, determination, word order, direct vs. indirect speech, sequence of tenses, use of complex tenses, etc. The SPAN 401 textbook contains an array of authentic readings about the culture, history, and politics of Spain and Latin America. The overall goal of SPAN 401 is to help students reach the ACTFL Language Testing Advanced-Low Level.

Honor section available.

Prerequisite(s): This course is the last in a series of Spanish language courses. Students must have taken SPAN 200 and SPAN 300 before enrolling for this course. The course is conducted in Spanish.

SPAN 415: Latin American Literature and Its Political Context (Credits: 3)

Gladys Ilarregui

This course will focus on the activism and resistance of different groups of historically oppressed communities around Latin America. It is the perfect course for those students interested in Human Rights. We will have focus on LA communities through film related to social movements, historical and literary readings, visual art, performance and social networks. The course will require your imagination and social commitment, and it will give you the tools to pursue community service at local and international levels. You will be exposed to awe-inspiring materials and thought-provoking lectures.

SPAN 416/616: Don Quijote (Credits: 3)

Jesús Botello

This course explores Cervantes and Spain’s most famous and best known work. We will read the entire 2 volumes in this course, with a focus on the social and literary concerns emblematic of Spain’s Golden Age. This includes a study of what good literature is, the relationship between good literature and life, the limits between reality and fiction, the role (and criticism) of Imperial Spain on the individual and his freedoms, the relationship between writing as a form of power and orality as a form or resistance to that power, moral and literary censure. Lastly, and as a means to contextualize the work in question, special attention will be paid to the sociocultural, political and religious life of the Spanish Golden Ages.

SPAN 421/621: Erotic literature in the middle ages and early modern (Credits: 3)

Cristina Guardiola

This course deals with explicit and pornographic literature and other media as a means to discredit political opponents, oppose moral and religious dictates, and explore the aesthetics of pleasure. It will deal with mature topics. Discretion is advised.

Celestina, by Fernando de Rojas (ed. By Dorothy Severin)

  • Paperback: 353 pages
  • Publisher: Catedra; Spanish edition (January 1, 2006)
  • Language: Spanish
  • ISBN-10: 8437607000

Carajicomedia, Anon. (ed. By Alvaro Alonso)

  • Paperback: 130 pages
  • Publisher: Ediciones Aljibe; 1ª ed. edition (January 1, 1995)
  • Language: Spanish
  • ISBN-10: 8487767435
  • ISBN-13: 978-8487767432

SPAN 436/636: Teatro del Siglo de Oro (Credits: 3)

Jesús Botello

This course explores canonical literary texts from Golden Age Theater, from the Renaissance to the Baroque. We will learn to read the texts of Hispanic literature within the cultural context of imperial Spain. We will examine the generic characteristics and analyze how the main concerns and themes change according to the evolution of Spanish society. Therefore, we will investigate extra literary aspects, such as the historical, social and political conditions that influenced the creation of the works. In order to gain an overview of the culture and literature of the Golden Age, especial attention will be paid to other art forms, such as painting, sculpture and architecture.

Prerequisite(s): One SPAN 300-level survey of literature course

SPAN 440-010: Mystery and Fantasy (Credits: 3)

Alexander Selimov

In this course students will read several outstanding short stories, to develop the ability to communicate their thoughts and ideas orally, read and write more proficiently, as well as learn how writers use conventional techniques to design their plots, configure characters, and create suspense. Students will practice summarizing content  in writing, as well as narrating and describing the content in all major time frames of past, present, and future in paragraph-length discourse. Students will learn new vocabulary and will write one short story as their final project.

SPAN 447/647-010/080: Contemporary Hispanic Fiction by Women (Credits: 3)

Joan Brown

This course explores outstanding contemporary fiction by women writers from Spain and Latin America. From a gender-bending short story to a supernatural memoir to a gripping war novel, these works provide a window into life and literature in Spain, Argentina, Chile and Puerto Rico. The primary goal of the course is to analyze outstanding works as individual literary creations while situating them in their literary, historical and socio-cultural contexts. An ancillary goal is to build skills in Spanish through interactive discussion, reading, and writing.

Prerequisite(s): One 300-level literary survey course.

SPAN 455-010: The Legend of Don Juan (Credits: 3)

Alex Selimov

This course explores dramatic and filmic manifestations of the Don Juan theme, one of the most intriguing creations of Western culture. Don Juan is a literary figure with a legendary dimension that transcended the borders of Spain and asserted its presence in other cultures, from Russia to England. Much has been written about the Don Juan phenomenon, and the different versions of the main story reflect the evolution of attitudes toward personal freedom, crime and punishment, male and female sexuality, religion, and society. The course format includes lectures and discussions, small group work, and written assignments. There will be a special focus, throughout the course, on reading comprehension, vocabulary and oral communication skills.

SPAN 455-080: Masterpieces of Contemporary Spanish Literature and Film (Credits: 3)

Joan L. Brown

This Honors seminar explores masterpieces of contemporary Spanish fiction and film, while asking: Why have certain works entered the cultural canon? What innovations defined them, and what reactions do they elicit today? From a conflicted priest to a sensitive university student to a heroic town councilman, a rebellious nun, an accidental murderer and a ruthless ogre, we will follow dramatic stories of men and women from across Spain. The goal of the course is to read and view intensively, concentrating on selected works in depth. Each narrative and film will be situated in its sociocultural, historical and critical contexts. Through use of Spanish in a seminar

setting, each student will build his or her critical abilities, cultural knowledge and language proficiency. This class meets with an MA-level graduate section that supports the Honors section.

Prerequisite(s): One 300-level survey of literature course. Permission of the Honors program is required for non-Honors students.

SPAN 475-010: “Canción de protesta”: Music and Revolution (Credits: 3)

Alexander Selimov

What is the contribution of music to the process of shaping political and social identities in Spain, Latin America and the Caribbean during the second half of the 20th century? How instrumental was the work of politically engaged songwriters for the process of nation-state building in the Hispanic World? These and other related questions will be answered throughout this course, as we will explore the many functions the artistic expression serves in political and social protest.

SPAN 476-010: Media-Savvy Populism from Che to Chávez (Credits: 3)

Phillip Penix-Tadsen

Desde la Revolución Cubana hasta las presidencias del recién fallido Hugo Chávez y sus aliados en la América Latina actual, los movimientos políticos populistas han incorporado múltiples medios en sus esfuerzos de revolucionar la vida de “el pueblo”.  Este curso se enfoca en ensayos, discursos, ficción, televisión, cine, artes visuales, producción en Internet y performance, explorando cómo los movimientos populistas han utilizado diferentes medios para transformar el ambiente político en la región hoy.

Prerequisite(s): Any 300-level survey course

SPAN 477: Drug Culture in Latin America (Credits: 3)

Phillip Penix-Tadsen

Drug production, trafficking, and consumption have had an immeasurable impact on culture in Latin America, affecting the region’s politics and way of life as well as its art and literature.  This course will examine the euphoria and the tragedy surrounding the drug trade, from psychedelic 1960s creative experiments, to Pablo Escobar’s cocaine empire in the 1980s, to the tragic wave of drug violence Mexico faces today.  These topics will be studied through the rigorous analysis of the region’s cultural production, including literature, fiction and documentary film, journalism, electronic media, political discourse, and visual arts.

Prerequisite(s): Any of the following: SPAN307, SPAN308, SPAN325, SPAN326

SPAN 490: Senior Capstone – Power, Violence & Sex in the Spanish Golden Age (Credits: 3)

Jesús Botello

This course explores literary texts from Golden Age Spain, from the Renaissance to the Baroque. We will learn to read these texts within the wider cultural context of Imperial Spain, its rise and decline. We will examine these works according to one related and recurrent aspect throughout time: the obsession with power (and connected to this, violence and sex).  In order to gain an overview of the culture and literature of the Golden Age, we will investigate extra literary aspects, such as the historical, social and political conditions that influenced the creation of these works. We will read not only literature, but also philosophy as well as political theory. Finally, special attention will be paid to diverse art forms affected by power, such as painting, sculpture and architecture.

SPAN 491-010/080: Culturas Digitales de América Latina y España (Credits: 3)

Phillip Penix-Tadsen

This course examines how new media forms have transformed culture in Latin America and Spain from the 20th to the 21st century, focusing on theoretical approaches to electronic media, as well as related cultural production from across the Spanish-speaking world: digital poetry, electronic literature, net art, online activism, social media, blogs, video games and virtual communities. This capstone course will also dedicate a significant portion of time to academic and professional development specifically tailored to majors in Spanish and Latin American and Iberian Studies, with workshops focused on preparing an academic portfolio, building a solid CV / Resume, and leveraging your multilingual capabilities when applying to graduate schools, internships and jobs.

Note: Fulfills Capstone requirement for SPAN and LAIS majors

SPAN 647-010: Contemporary Hispanic Fiction by Women (Credits: 3)

Joan Brown

This course explores outstanding contemporary fiction by women writers from Spain and Latin America. From a gender-bending short story to a supernatural memoir to a gripping war novel, these works provide a window into life and literature in Spain, Argentina, Chile and Puerto Rico. The primary goal of the course is to analyze outstanding works as individual literary creations while situating them in their literary, historical and socio-cultural contexts. Ancillary goals are to build critical skills and acquire strategies for teaching literature.

Meets with an undergraduate Honors section, SPAN 447-080.

SPAN 655-010: Masterpieces of Contemporary Spanish Literature and Film (Credits: 3)

Joan L. Brown

This graduate seminar explores masterpieces of contemporary Spanish fiction and film, while asking: Why have certain works entered the cultural canon? What innovations defined them, and what reactions do they elicit today? Novels on the MA Reading List include San Manuel Buenomártir by Miguel de Unamuno, Nada by Carmen Laforet and Réquiem por un campesino español by Ramón Sender. These works and additional films (two from the Reading List) will be situated in their historical, sociocultural and critical contexts. The goal of the course is to read and view intensively, concentrating on selected works in depth. Each student will build his or her critical skills while preparing for the Contemporary Peninsular portion of the MA Comprehensive Exam. This section meets with an Honors undergraduate section, and graduate students will engage with the pedagogy of teaching literature and film.

SPAN 875-010: Love and Passion in the Middle Ages (Credits: 3)

Cristina Guardiola

Este curso tiene la finalidad de analizar la actitud en la edad media hacia el amor y su efecto en los amantes. Con frecuencia el amor no logrado termina produciendo la llamada enfermedad del amor (mal de amores). Se estudiarán también las manifestaciones del amor cortés y el tema del debate sobre las mujeres, relacionándolo con la actitud pro y misoginista, ésta última tan generalizada en los tiempos medievales. Con este enfoque leeremos una serie de obras típicas de la literatura europea (De amore (Ovidio, Andreas Capellanus), Roman de la Rose, Christine de Pisan) y especialmente castellana (entre otras, el Libro de buen amor, Cárcel de amor, Grisel y Mirabella, La Celestina).

SPAN 875-011: Topics Course (Peninsular) From Censorship to Freedom: Literary Movements in Contemporary Spain (Credits: 3)

Joan Brown

This course traces major literary movements in contemporary Spanish fiction across genres. The period covered begins with the Franco era (1939-75) and extends through the Transition (1975-82) to democratic Spain (1982 to the present).  Existentialism, neorealism, metafiction and hybrid literature will be explored through representative novels, short stories and a play. Each work will be situated in its literary, historical, cultural and critical contexts. All course texts are on the MA Reading List in Contemporary Peninsular Literature. This course is an interactive seminar with an emphasis on building individual critical skills

Prerequisite(s): Open to MA students only.

SPAN 875: From Codex to Archives (Credits: 3)

Gladys Ilarregui

This seminar will cover major works from the MA list on Colonial Literature for graduate students. The class will start by acknowledging pre-Hispanic literacy in the Mesoamerican Codex and move toward travel literature written during the contact period. The class will provide major readings, documentaries and film, digital archives, and all the necessary elements to assess the rich and conflictive period of Colonial Latin America. Bring your imagination, intellectual curiosity and creativity to see how Latin America had a past that is absolutely breathtaking. Maya/ Aztec/ Inca Empires and Aymara thought will be examined throughout the semester.

SPAN 875: Enlightenment & Romanticism (Credits: 3)

Alexander Selimov

The graduate seminar is focused 100% on required readings from the 19th century Latin American and Peninsular areas of the MA reading list. Students will be able to claim it either as their qualifying Latin American course or Spanish Peninsular course for the MA degree, but not both. The list includes the following items: a selection of 18th and 19th/century Spanish poetry, Cartas Marruecas, Artículos de Costumbres, El señor de Bembibre, Doña Perfecta, Latin American selection of poetry, Don Catrín de la fachenda, María, Sab & Tradiciones peruanas

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  • Department of Languages, Literatures & Cultures
  • Jastak-Burgess Hall
  • University of Delaware
  • 30 East Main St.
  • Newark, DE 19716, USA
  • Phone: 302-831-2591
  • dllc-academics@udel.edu